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Posts Tagged ‘Shrub Doctor’

jack-olantern-mushroomShrub Doctor was called assess the health of this oak tree yesterday. Normally mushrooms and fungal conks growing at the base of a tree indicate advanced stages of root decay. In this case, the tree was in perfect health.

These Jack O’lantern mushrooms are actually living off of the decaying mulch and leaf debris surrounding the tree. Jack O’lantern mushrooms get their name from the strange glow that is emitted from their underbelly. Jack O’lantern mushrooms contain a substance similar to that of a lightning bug, causing the areas around the mushroom to emit a faint glow in darkness.

If you see mushrooms growing around the base of your trees, call Shrub Doctor immediately. Not all assessments of basal fungi end in good news. Our ISA Certified Arborists will provide you a clear and accurate assessment of your trees so you will have a better understanding of the health of your landscape.

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Smooth patch 1Shrub Doctor noticed a good example of  smooth patch fungus activity on this tree today. Also known as white patch, this fungus decomposes the corky outer bark layer of the tree. Since the patch fungus only invades the nonliving outer bark tissues, no harm is done to the tree. Smooth patch is one of many natural occurrences that can be found in our landscapes. No treatments are needed, and your tree should recover over the future seasons. If you notice concerns with your trees and shrubs within your landscape give Shrub Doctor a call. One of our ISA Certified Arborists will be glad to schedule a visit and provide solutions that will keep your plants healthy and vigorous for many years to come.

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Rhododendrun 1

If you notice the leaves on your plants curling don’t be alarmed. By curling its leaves, this shrub reduces its chance of loosing moisture from the cold and dry winds. As soon it begins to warm, the foliage will return to its normal shape. Winter leaf curl is common with rhododendron and laurel shrubs, so don’t be alarmed if your camellia shrubs show this same condition as well.

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2015 azaleas 22015 azaleasShrub Doctor was visiting a long time South Charlotte customer the other day, and were lucky enough to catch their azaleas in full bloom. We are now beginning our 10th season serving this customer. Hard work and  good organic nutrients have made these azaleas very healthy.

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Ice stress 2Ice Stress 1 Last night’s storm left a frozen coating to the stalks and foliage of all our plants. Notice my camellia in the second photo. The weight of the ice has caused the limbs to droop and bend. Our first reaction is to shake off the snow and ice to keep our shrubs from breaking down. Shrub Doctor recommends that you refrain from this practice. Yes you may lose a limb or two by the heavy ice, but violent shaking to break off the ice may do more damage to the frozen stems of the plant. A better practice is to cover and support your shrubs prior to a predicted ice storm. (Mark Tally)

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Tree straps 1 Tree straps 2 Tree straps 3 We were treating a new customer’s property the other day and noticed some mature trees with support straps girdling their trunk. The trees had been neglected for so long that the straps were now impossible to remove. We were successful in cutting one strap but the others were too deep to remove. As the tree grows larger, these straps will possibly cut off the flow of moisture and nutrients to the canopy. Over time the trees will decline and possibly die due to this condition. Support straps can usually be removed after a full year past installation, or until the tree develops enough root mass to support itself. Leaving straps on trees for too long can end in a mess. If you have any questions or concerns with the health of your trees, give Shrub Doctor a call. We are ISA certified arborists and will gladly give you a free analysis of any tree within your landscape. Call me personally at 704-920-0290, or email me at mark.tally@shrubdoctor.com

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Myers Park is one of the oldest and most prominent areas of Charlotte, NC. It began development soon after World War I, and many of its trees are almost 100 years old. Charlotte is known for its majestic trees, and now Myers Park is saddled with the challenge of how to save them. As you see in the photos, many of the street lined trees have never had an adequate area to grow, and are now being invaded by roads, driveways, and sidewalks. Shrub Doctor is also seeing the signs of decay in several trees. As a tree ages, it often experiences root rot diseases. As the roots decay, the tree becomes very vulnerable to uprooting in a storm. Attached are photos of fungal conks growing on the root flairs at the tree’s base.. These trees will become more and more dangerous as the decay progresses. In one photo Shrub Doctor identified a huge tree that is slowly declining. Notice in the second photo that its directly in front of a very beautiful home. This is just one of several examples that can be seen while walking in Myers Park. If you see issues with your trees give Shrub Doctor a call. Mark Tally is a certified ISA arborist and will gladly meet with you. He will provide a free evaluation of your trees and provide solutions that can add years of life to your landscape. Give him a call today, 704-920-0290, or contact Mark Tally at mark.tally@shrubdoctor.com /2014/12/myers-park-1.jpg”>Myers Park 1 Myers Park 2 Myers Park 3 Myers Park 4 Myers Park 5 Myers Park 6 Myers Park 7 Myers Park 8

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