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Posts Tagged ‘Charlotte shrub care’

Azalea 2015About two years ago I found several azaleas thrown into a pile by the side of the road. They were all very weak and drying out. I took about 10 of them home and repotted them. Since then I have given them all away but this one. After only a few seasons this azalea is doing great. No one would ever know it was a shrub that was saved from the landfill. M. Tally.

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Oak Tree Decline

Here’s an example of an oak tree that is experiencing serious stress due to its new urban environment. You will notice the small sprouting branches along its trunk, and the dead limbs in its crown.  Not many years ago this tree was thriving in the forest. Urban development cleared away the other trees and left this one in the landscape. This tree has survived the removal of its organic top soil, heavy grading and change of topography, and the construction of this house. The tree now experiences competition with the turf, compacted soil, and a serious reduction of organic nutrition.

Shrub Doctor is regularly contacted to help trees in this state of stress. Our certified arborists will assess the health of the tree, recommend  removal of limbs and dead wood from the crown, and treat the tree with our organic nutrients to restore its health and promote root growth.  Shrub Doctor has over ten years experience restoring the health of Charlotte’s prized trees.  Call Shrub Doctor today for a free evaluation of your tree’s health.  Contact us at 704-490-2000. Our doctors still make house calls.

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2015 azaleas 22015 azaleasShrub Doctor was visiting a long time South Charlotte customer the other day, and were lucky enough to catch their azaleas in full bloom. We are now beginning our 10th season serving this customer. Hard work and  good organic nutrients have made these azaleas very healthy.

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Boxwood cover 2Boxwood cover 3boxwood cover 1 Last night’s snow heavily weighed down the limbs of my trees and shrubs. Here is an example of a boxwood shrub that is spread open by the snow. Heavy snow can severely damage your shrubs unless you take preventative action prior to the storm. In the following images you will see how I covered my prize 55 year old english boxwood prior to the snow and how it looked after being protected in its cozy cacoon.

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Cold temperatures 1Cold temperatures 2 It was 8 degrees when I left the house this morning. My orphan rhododendron shrub was all curled up and prepared for the cold. Plants are amazing living things. This curl is a natural reaction to the cold. The plant curls its foliage very tight to protect its inner surfaces from the cold and dry winds. This protects the delicate cells from freezing, and keeps the plant from dehydrating.

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Ice stress 2Ice Stress 1 Last night’s storm left a frozen coating to the stalks and foliage of all our plants. Notice my camellia in the second photo. The weight of the ice has caused the limbs to droop and bend. Our first reaction is to shake off the snow and ice to keep our shrubs from breaking down. Shrub Doctor recommends that you refrain from this practice. Yes you may lose a limb or two by the heavy ice, but violent shaking to break off the ice may do more damage to the frozen stems of the plant. A better practice is to cover and support your shrubs prior to a predicted ice storm. (Mark Tally)

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gloomy scale picgloomy scale 3 I noticed this maple tree today while taking a walk around inner Charlotte. The small bumps on the bark of this limb are gloomy scale insect shells. Gloomy scale is an invasive insect that attaches itself to the limbs of the tree and feed on the sugary sap just below the bark. In the late spring season, hundreds of scale insect eggs hatch from each existing shell and continue the cycle of infestation. Over time, the scale activity drains the tree of its energy and causes the tree to die. This photo shows a serious case of scale infestation. The black color that you see is mold growing on the excessive sticky sap excreted by the scale. We call this black substance “sooty mold”, due to its sooty black appearance. Many urban maple trees in the Charlotte communities are infested with gloomy scale. Winter is a great time to discover this issue since the trees are free of leaves. If gloomy scale is discovered in time, Shrub Doctor can sucessfully kill the scale infestation, and restore the tree to optimal health. If you find gloomy scale in your landscape, don’t hesitate to give Shrub Doctor a call. We’ll gladly visit your property and give you a free assessment of the condition. Shrub Doctor Inc, has ISA Certified Arborists on staff to diagnose any and all of your trees and plants within your landscape.

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