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Archive for the ‘Shrub care’ Category

Smooth patch 1Shrub Doctor noticed a good example of  smooth patch fungus activity on this tree today. Also known as white patch, this fungus decomposes the corky outer bark layer of the tree. Since the patch fungus only invades the nonliving outer bark tissues, no harm is done to the tree. Smooth patch is one of many natural occurrences that can be found in our landscapes. No treatments are needed, and your tree should recover over the future seasons. If you notice concerns with your trees and shrubs within your landscape give Shrub Doctor a call. One of our ISA Certified Arborists will be glad to schedule a visit and provide solutions that will keep your plants healthy and vigorous for many years to come.

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Hugel Kulture 1Hugel Kulture 2Hugel Kulture 3Hugel Kulture 4Shrub Doctor recently utilized an old sustainable planting technique when transplanting this 50 year old acuba shrub. The hole was made deep enough to accept several small logs in the bottom. A thin layer of soil was added then watered to fill all the gaps around the logs. The shrub was planted directly on top of the logs. Over time, the logs will absorb and hold water, as well as provide an increased environment of beneficial fungi to the shrub’s root system. This planting practice will allow your shrubs to stay well hydrated during periods of drought. The decaying logs will also provide good organic nutrients for many seasons to come. To learn more about how you can adopt this technique in your landscape give Shrub Doctor a call. Call 1-888-2GO-Organic for more information about our 100% organic shrub and tree fertilization programs.

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azalaea 2fire azalea Here is a photo of the only “Fire Azalea” that I’ve ever seen in the urban landscape. In fact, this one is in a very natural setting, on a large property at Lake Norman. It was brought down from the Blue Ridge area about 30 years ago. The other photo is of an azalea growing on a high country ridge in the Smoky Mountains. Fire azaleas are a natural species, and are not normally seen in the Charlotte area.

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Spencer shrubs 1spencer shrubs 2Shrub Doctor received these photos from a happy customer in Glen Eagles. We have been treating this property for a full year now, and are very excited with the results.

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Beam #1 Beam #2 Beam #3 It was 92 degrees, and full sun when I took these photos. Notice how the azaleas are just cruisin’ through the day with no concerns. This homeowner took his time to research the limitations of his shrubs prior to planting, and has now had many years of beautiful healthy azaleas. Shrub Doctor can’t emphasize more the importance of planting the right plant in the correct place. All the nutrition in the world won’t keep plants healthy if they’re planted in the wrong conditions.

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Camellia leaf gall I saw the first camellia leaf gall this season. When I went home, and found two on my camellia shrubs. Camellia Leaf Gall is a normal occurrence that is harmless to the plant. You will be shocked when you first see one, because they appear to be a distorted, rubbery camellia leaf. The phenomenon is caused by a fungus. If left on the plant, this gall will gradually decompose and drop to the ground, distributing thousands of fungal spores to the soil. These spores will cause more galls to appear in future seasons. Best practice is to remove the galls when you see them, and throw them away. Don’t worry. Your camellia is OK. It just looks a little odd for awhile.

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